ohnoproblems

xmaslemmings:

The shift to mobile web and the new providers/devices common to that realm has been and will continue to be used as an opportunity to terraform cultural consensus on what the web “is,” away from the considerably less restrictive WWW of the 90s and 00s and towards a model of services largely authored and controlled by corporate wealth. The death of net neutrality and the promise of a web in which providers actively value or devalue data and degrade access accordingly is married perfectly to the notion that a “website” is not code accessible through a browser installed on any machine, but a program that must be purchased or accessed through specific, regulated channels. iOS and Android are test environments in which newly constrained modes for interacting with the Internet (or computers themselves) are naturalized, the hope being that a six year old with an iPad will never fully grasp that things could be or ever had been different.

shit’s getting spooky, folks

maybeedmonton

resistkxl:

inothernews
inothernews:

When superstorm Sandy struck Fire Island off of Long Island’s south shore, it washed away more than 70 feet of a sand dune, revealing a shipwreck thought to be a cargo ship that dates back to just after the Civil War — or possibly a Canadian schooner that was lost in the 1920’s.  (Photo: US Coast Guard via The New York Daily News)

inothernews:

When superstorm Sandy struck Fire Island off of Long Island’s south shore, it washed away more than 70 feet of a sand dune, revealing a shipwreck thought to be a cargo ship that dates back to just after the Civil War — or possibly a Canadian schooner that was lost in the 1920’s.  (Photo: US Coast Guard via The New York Daily News)

clothesandbuttons
lifeaquatic:

Have you heard about Attawapiskat? If you’re in Canada, probably; if you’re in the US, probably not. In a nutshell: a Native community in Northern Ontario declared a state of emergency over third world living conditions a few weeks ago and the Canadian government’s response was, “We gave you $90 million, what’s your problem?”
Now there’s an investigation into where federal funding has gone, the reserve is being run by a third party and there are all kinds of batshit racist comments flying around because many people who are unfamiliar with how Native reserves function (and the history of their creation under colonial rule) think it’s ridiculous that anybody could receive federal funding and still suffer. 
You can find information on Attawapiskat here and the topic more generally here. A google search will also lead you to a jillion news links where you can sort the wheat from the chaff on your own if you like. 
Native issues tend to make it into the news in Canada more than in the US, so while I find this all to be horrible, I also see this as an opportunity for people to learn more about living conditions on reserves and, more importantly, the system that led to them in the first place. 
I could rant about this forever but instead I’ll just encourage you to listen and witness and think about the social, economic, political and legal frameworks that led to this situation in the first place. Do some research. Learn about the Native history of the place you call home and about who those people are today. Don’t erase Native history from the landscape and don’t allow the Canadian and US governments to continue to make Native issues invisible. 

lifeaquatic:

Have you heard about Attawapiskat? If you’re in Canada, probably; if you’re in the US, probably not. In a nutshell: a Native community in Northern Ontario declared a state of emergency over third world living conditions a few weeks ago and the Canadian government’s response was, “We gave you $90 million, what’s your problem?”

Now there’s an investigation into where federal funding has gone, the reserve is being run by a third party and there are all kinds of batshit racist comments flying around because many people who are unfamiliar with how Native reserves function (and the history of their creation under colonial rule) think it’s ridiculous that anybody could receive federal funding and still suffer. 

You can find information on Attawapiskat here and the topic more generally here. A google search will also lead you to a jillion news links where you can sort the wheat from the chaff on your own if you like. 

Native issues tend to make it into the news in Canada more than in the US, so while I find this all to be horrible, I also see this as an opportunity for people to learn more about living conditions on reserves and, more importantly, the system that led to them in the first place

I could rant about this forever but instead I’ll just encourage you to listen and witness and think about the social, economic, political and legal frameworks that led to this situation in the first place. Do some research. Learn about the Native history of the place you call home and about who those people are today. Don’t erase Native history from the landscape and don’t allow the Canadian and US governments to continue to make Native issues invisible. 

nationalpost
nationalpost:

Our sports editors are REALLY excited about the start of the new season.
nationalpostsports:

NHL PREVIEW: Feeling clueless about the start of NHL season? Read our hockey cheat sheet and impress your friends when the puck drops on Thursday.


props to the Post on a really pretty break page
more of these, plz

nationalpost:

Our sports editors are REALLY excited about the start of the new season.

nationalpostsports:

NHL PREVIEW: Feeling clueless about the start of NHL season? Read our hockey cheat sheet and impress your friends when the puck drops on Thursday.

props to the Post on a really pretty break page

more of these, plz

inothernews
inothernews:

“How I spent my last day in #space That’s me in the cupola off the coast of #Australia taking my last of >25K pics.”

— NASA astronaut RON GARAN, via Twitter. (Click through for larger.)
A great photo.  As Gizmodo puts it, “This awesome image of the Space Station could be a lost Star Wars frame.”


that wee bubble is the atmosphere
mother of god

inothernews:

“How I spent my last day in #space That’s me in the cupola off the coast of #Australia taking my last of >25K pics.”

— NASA astronaut RON GARAN, via Twitter. (Click through for larger.)

A great photo.  As Gizmodo puts it, “This awesome image of the Space Station could be a lost Star Wars frame.”

that wee bubble is the atmosphere

mother of god

inothernews
inothernews:

msnbc:

Epic dodge ball game sets record in Edmondton, Canada: Participants throw balls as 2,012 students compete in a game of dodge ball at the University of Alberta Universiade Pavilion, on Feb. 4, in Edmonton, Canada/ The game eclipsed the current Guinness World Record, which was set by just over 1700 students at UC Irvine last September in California. (John Ulan / The Canadian Press via AP)
More photos here

Yeah, it’s not like Canadians are using those basketball courts for basketball anyway, amirite?  JUST KIDDING, CANADA.

that’s my school

inothernews:

msnbc:

Epic dodge ball game sets record in Edmondton, Canada: Participants throw balls as 2,012 students compete in a game of dodge ball at the University of Alberta Universiade Pavilion, on Feb. 4, in Edmonton, Canada/ The game eclipsed the current Guinness World Record, which was set by just over 1700 students at UC Irvine last September in California. (John Ulan / The Canadian Press via AP)

More photos here

Yeah, it’s not like Canadians are using those basketball courts for basketball anyway, amirite?  JUST KIDDING, CANADA.

that’s my school

soupsoup
From the early 1930’s until the modern story broke in 2004, the newspapers that covered waterboarding almost uniformly called the practice torture or implied it was torture: The New York Times characterized it thus in 81.5% (44 of 54) of articles on the subject and The Los Angeles Times did so in 96.3% of articles (26 of 27). By contrast, from 2002-2008, the studied newspapers almost never referred to waterboarding as torture. The New York Times called waterboarding torture or implied it was torture in just 2 of 143 articles (1.4%). The Los Angeles Times did so in 4.8% of articles (3 of 63). The Wall Street Journal characterized the practice as torture in just 1 of 63 articles (1.6%). USA Today never called waterboarding torture or implied it was torture.

Kennedy School of Government at Harvard report, which leads Will Bunch to remark:

“Never before in my adult life have I been so ashamed of my profession, journalism.”

(via soupsoup)