themarysue

themarysue:

Ada was born in 1815, the only legitimate child of poet/loveable whack-job Lord Byron (you know, the guy who hung out with Shelley and Keats? And wrote Don Juan and Childe Harold? And then went a bit nuts and tried to take over Greece? Yeah, that guy). Ada never met her father, since he was off being kind of nuts, and her mother was like “Ada, you are ONLY learning MATH and SCIENCE lest you become like your CRAZY FATHER by indulging in EVIL POETRY.”

But you just couldn’t hold Ada down because she did what she wanted to, you know? Ill a bunch as a child (and not like, “the illest” or whatever; like, ACTUALLY sick), Ada spent a lot of time reading (shout-out to frail, shy kids that read a lot of books) and developing her interest in the sciences. But fascinated by stories of her father, Ada wasn’t all about numbers – at 12, she decided that she wanted to fly, and used her wild imagination and scientific know-how to design a pair of mechanical wings, so basically she INVENTED Steampunk. By 18, she was having an affair with her tutor (YEAH SHE DID), but Ada’s mother covered it all up by sending her to court and marrying her off to a Baron, with whom she would have three kids but WHATEVER.

But do you think Ada let the married life slow her down HELL NAW SHE DIDN’T. She loved gambling and parties, and her chillness with dudes meant she was often followed by scandalous gossip (some things never change, amiright?). Obsessed with fairies and the “unseen worlds around us,” Ada would come to describe herself as an “Analyst (& Metaphysician),” studying “poetical science,” and publishing papers about how the brain creates thoughts and how music relates to math. Holy DAMN try to tell me that’s not kick-ass because I WON’T BELIEVE YOU.

- It’s Ada Lovelace Day, So Here’s A Brief History Of Her EXTREME RADNESS | The Mary Sue

theolduvaigorge

climateadaptation:

Canadians have also fired thousands of scientists, gutted environmental laws, and replaced science posts with oil executives.

theolduvaigorge

dailyscientists:

October 15th is the Ada Lovelace Day, an annual celebration of the achievements of women in science and technology.

Ada Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852), often described as the world’s first computer programmer, showed a keen interest in mathematical studies from an early age and was taught by her mother, Annabella, who was also a gifted mathematician.

In correspondence with Charles Babbage, who was working on the ideas for a machine that is now recognised as a forerunner of the modern computer, Ada demonstrated her gift for mathematics and was described by him as “the enchantress of numbers”.

She was introduced to him by another female scientist famous in her day, the mathematician Mary Somerville, who mentored Ada during her relatively short life.

Babbage was impressed by the mathematical skills Ada possessed and invited her to translate a piece in Italian written by Luigi Menabrea describing Babbage’s ‘analytical engine’, so that it could be published in England.

Her notes include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine, while she also speculated on its future ability to create graphics and complex music.

Born in 1815, she had no relationship with her father, who died when she was eight. In 1835, she married William King, who was created Earl of Lovelace in 1838. She died in 1852 at the age of 36.

Her lasting legacy as role model for girls and young women considering careers in technology is remembered on Ada Lovelace Day, which is dedicated to the celebration of the achievements of women in science and technology. (Source: http://www.theguardian.com)

floatingwalrus
Many adults are put off when youngsters pose scientific questions. Children ask why the sun is yellow, or what a dream is, or how deep you can dig a hole, or when is the world’s birthday, or why we have toes. Too many teachers and parents answer with irritation or ridicule, or quickly move on to something else. Why adults should pretend to omniscience before a five-year-old, I can’t for the life of me understand. What’s wrong with admitting that you don’t know? Children soon recognize that somehow this kind of question annoys many adults. A few more experiences like this, and another child has been lost to science. There are many better responses. If we have an idea of the answer, we could try to explain. If we don’t, we could go to the encyclopedia or the library. Or we might say to the child: “I don’t know the answer. Maybe no one knows. Maybe when you grow up, you’ll be the first to find out.
Carl Sagan (via ikenbot)
hanalite

unhistorical:

December 10, 1815: Ada Lovelace is born.

image

Today’s Google Doodle honors Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s only legitimate child and the woman who is popularly credited as “the world’s first computer programmer”. Lady Byron, who separated from Ada’s father just a month after she was born, sought to raise her daughter in a manner that ensured she would not end up like her volatile poet father. Ada, often ill as a child, began studying mathematics at a young age and soon discovered her natural flair for the subject, so strong that one of her tutors, Augustus De Morgan, suggested that she become a mathematician “of first-rate eminence” later in life. In 1833, Ada attempted to elope with another one of her tutors, although her attempt failed, and the entire incident was covered up.

That year, she also met Charles Babbage, a mathematician and inventor with whom Ada shared a close correspondence for the rest of her life. Over a nine-month-long period in 1842 and 1843, Ada translated an Italian memoir regarding Babbage’s Analytical Engine; she supplemented her translation with her own set of notes (which actually ended up longer than the memoir itself) explaining in detail the differences between Babbage’s machine and his Difference Engine. Ada was optimistic about the future of these engines and machines. Although a mathematician, she was not limited by numbers and predicted that someday a more complex descendant of Babbage’s engines “might act upon other things besides number… the Engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent”. She also provided what is today recognized as “the world’s first computer program” - a proposed algorithm that would generate Bernoulli numbers using the analytical machine. Whether Ada formulated the plan herself, or whether it was the product of close collaboration between herself, Babbage, and associates, or whether it was someone else’s work entirely, remains subject to debate to this day. Babbage, at least, was as impressed by Ada as she was by him; in 1843 he wrote of her:

Forget this world and all its troubles and if
possible its multitudinous Charlatans – every thing
in short but the 
Enchantress of Numbers.

floatingwalrus
scinerds:

Happy Birthday Bill Nye the Science Guy!
“Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.” ― Bill Nye
Oh the lessons I’ve learned from this wonderful person! It is our honor here at Scinerds to give a warm Happy bday post to one of our beloved heroes of science, the science guy! May he continue to educate the masses so successfully as he has always done.
William Sanford “Bill” Nye (born November 27, 1955), popularly known as Bill Nye the Science Guy, is an American science educator, comedian, television host, actor, mechanical engineer, writer, and scientist. He is best known as the host of the Disney/PBS children’s science show Bill Nye the Science Guy (1993–98) and for his many subsequent appearances in popular media as a science educator.

scinerds:

Happy Birthday Bill Nye the Science Guy!

“Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.”Bill Nye

Oh the lessons I’ve learned from this wonderful person! It is our honor here at Scinerds to give a warm Happy bday post to one of our beloved heroes of science, the science guy! May he continue to educate the masses so successfully as he has always done.

William Sanford “Bill” Nye (born November 27, 1955), popularly known as Bill Nye the Science Guy, is an American science educator, comedian, television host, actor, mechanical engineer, writer, and scientist. He is best known as the host of the Disney/PBS children’s science show Bill Nye the Science Guy (1993–98) and for his many subsequent appearances in popular media as a science educator.

colossal-skeleton
baltimere:

teal-deer:

betterworlds:

Today, in things we never expected to be posting to this blog as serious technology: The Warp Drive.
Apparently, scientists at NASA have developed a mathematical model showing that true warp drive may be possible using practical amounts of energy.
This would make it possible to get to the star system closest to Earth in about 5 months.
Amazing.  Now, they must test it in the lab.

space space space space 


space space sapce sapce scpa es fgSSCCCIIENCEEEEEEE


now they must test it in a lab

baltimere:

teal-deer:

betterworlds:

Today, in things we never expected to be posting to this blog as serious technology: The Warp Drive.

Apparently, scientists at NASA have developed a mathematical model showing that true warp drive may be possible using practical amounts of energy.

This would make it possible to get to the star system closest to Earth in about 5 months.

Amazing.  Now, they must test it in the lab.

space space space space

space space sapce sapce scpa es fgSSCCCIIENCEEEEEEE

now they must test it in a lab

dvdp
dvdp:

this has to be here.
first views from NASA’s Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars the evening of Aug. 5 PDT. It was taken through a “fisheye” wide-angle lens on one of the rover’s Hazard-Avoidance cameras. These engineering cameras are located at the rover’s base. As planned, the early images are lower resolution. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/96629/long-live-american-curiosity-now-we-start-exploring-mars/#ixzz22nAg0S48

dvdp:

this has to be here.

first views from NASA’s Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars the evening of Aug. 5 PDT. It was taken through a “fisheye” wide-angle lens on one of the rover’s Hazard-Avoidance cameras. These engineering cameras are located at the rover’s base. As planned, the early images are lower resolution.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

selfesteampunk

15 Misconceptions About Evolution

I don’t think these will surprise any of my followers but it’s always nice to have a refresher

divineirony:

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos


15. Evolution is a theory about the origin of life

The theory of evolution primarily deals with the manner in which life has changed after its origin. While science is interested in the origins of life (for example the composition of the primeval sludge from which life might have come) but these are not issues covered in the area of evolution. What is known is that regardless of the start, at some point life began to branch off. Evolution is, therefore, dedicated to the study of those processes.


14. Organisms are always getting better

While it is a fact that natural selection weeds out unhealthy genes from the gene pool, there are many cases where an imperfect organism has survived. Some examples of this are fungi, sharks, crayfish, and mosses – these have all remained essentially the same over a great period of time. These organisms are all sufficiently adapted to their environment to survive without improvement.

Other taxa have changed a lot, but not necessarily for the better. Some creatures have had their environments changed and their adaptations may not be as well suited to their new situation. Fitness is linked to their environment, not to progress.

Read More

theatlantic
theatlantic:

Science Picture of the Day: The Mars Horizon

NASA’s Mars Rover Opportunity captured this image looking eastward over the Endeavour Crater late in the afternoon of Opportunity’s 2,888th Martian sol (day) which corresponded with March 9, 2012 here on Earth. In the foreground, Opportunity’s own shadow appears, in a sort of one-step-removed self-portrait. […] The image is a mosaic of about a dozen images and presented in false color to draw out certain features of the topography.
[Image: NASA]

theatlantic:

Science Picture of the Day: The Mars Horizon

NASA’s Mars Rover Opportunity captured this image looking eastward over the Endeavour Crater late in the afternoon of Opportunity’s 2,888th Martian sol (day) which corresponded with March 9, 2012 here on Earth. In the foreground, Opportunity’s own shadow appears, in a sort of one-step-removed self-portrait. […] The image is a mosaic of about a dozen images and presented in false color to draw out certain features of the topography.

[Image: NASA]

crashinglybeautiful
You boys know what tropism is, it’s what makes a plant grow toward the light. Everything aspires to the light. You don’t have to chase down a fly to get rid of it - you just darken the room, leave a crack of light in a window, and out he goes. Works every time. We all have that instinct, that aspiration. Science can’t dim that. All science can do is turn out the false lights so the true light can get us home.
Tobias Wolff, Old School (via crashinglybeautiful)